/page/2

design-is-fine:

William Morris, artwork for The Story of the Dwellers at Eyr’, 1871. Via Birmingham Museums.

Morris had been fascinated by medieval illuminated manuscripts since childhood. This is his translation of the Eyrbtggja Saga, the first of the Norse sagas he had read with the Icelandic scholar Eirikr Magnusson. 

(via christoph-liebe)

archaicwonder:

Mary Queen of Scots at Wingfield Manor, Derbyshire, England
Wingfield Manor was built around 1450 for Ralph de Cromwell, 3rd Baron Cromwell, then Chancellor of England, on the site of a 12th-century castle and was bought by the second Earl of Shrewsbury. The design was the inspiration for Hampton Court Palace in London.
The sixth Earl of Shrewsbury was entrusted with the care of Mary, Queen of Scots, when she was detained from 1569 onwards, in his various houses around Derbyshire, Wingfield among them. It may have been here that she met Anthony Babington, whose family lived at Dethick nearby, who organised the abortive Babington Plot, a Recusant Catholic plot against Elizabeth I. The walnut tree in the north courtyard is reputed to have grown from a seed left when Anthony Babington smeared walnut juice over his face to disguise himself and enter the castle to see Mary, Queen of Scots. Unfortunately, the tree is not old enough for this story to be true.
At the time of the English Civil War (1642–48), the manor was in the hands of the Earl of Shrewsbury, a Parliament supporter. The Manor was taken by the Royalists in 1643 and then, after a siege, retaken by Parliament in 1644. It was located in what was then a strategic position near a main north-south artery of the country. It was partially demolished at the end of the Civil War, and then renovated some years later for Immanuel Halton, an astronomer. It was later further damaged when stone was taken for building Wingfield Hall, in the valley below. The manor has been deserted since the 1770s.

archaicwonder:

Mary Queen of Scots at Wingfield Manor, Derbyshire, England

Wingfield Manor was built around 1450 for Ralph de Cromwell, 3rd Baron Cromwell, then Chancellor of England, on the site of a 12th-century castle and was bought by the second Earl of Shrewsbury. The design was the inspiration for Hampton Court Palace in London.

The sixth Earl of Shrewsbury was entrusted with the care of Mary, Queen of Scots, when she was detained from 1569 onwards, in his various houses around Derbyshire, Wingfield among them. It may have been here that she met Anthony Babington, whose family lived at Dethick nearby, who organised the abortive Babington Plot, a Recusant Catholic plot against Elizabeth I. The walnut tree in the north courtyard is reputed to have grown from a seed left when Anthony Babington smeared walnut juice over his face to disguise himself and enter the castle to see Mary, Queen of Scots. Unfortunately, the tree is not old enough for this story to be true.

At the time of the English Civil War (1642–48), the manor was in the hands of the Earl of Shrewsbury, a Parliament supporter. The Manor was taken by the Royalists in 1643 and then, after a siege, retaken by Parliament in 1644. It was located in what was then a strategic position near a main north-south artery of the country. It was partially demolished at the end of the Civil War, and then renovated some years later for Immanuel Halton, an astronomer. It was later further damaged when stone was taken for building Wingfield Hall, in the valley below. The manor has been deserted since the 1770s.

(via musicmusingsandpoetry)

groundcovers:

Situated in the middle of a densely forested section of the Reford property, Rotunda, by Spanish firm City Laboratory, is designed to evolve over time, showcasing the ephemeral qualities of the natural world. In the beginning, the large, irregular black-metal disk will function as an ordinary reflecting pool.
Annual garden festival on the southern shore of the Saint Lawrence River in Quebec

groundcovers:

Situated in the middle of a densely forested section of the Reford property, Rotunda, by Spanish firm City Laboratory, is designed to evolve over time, showcasing the ephemeral qualities of the natural world. In the beginning, the large, irregular black-metal disk will function as an ordinary reflecting pool.

Annual garden festival on the southern shore of the Saint Lawrence River in Quebec

(via beverleyshiller)

cross-connect:

Ines Seidel is a book and paper artist based in Munich, Germany and probably best known for her altered books and paper objects.

About the work Seidel writes in her blog:

Instead of going on with their stories, these books remember where they came from and how everything began. I offered them black and white pictures of tree parts and dried twigs, all from my immediate surrounding. The books venture into a kind of regression therapy, where painful moments from childhood or even earlier lives are relived.

                                       :-)

(via beverleyshiller)

inneroptics:

Amanda Jasnowski

inneroptics:

Amanda Jasnowski

inneroptics:

Solarization, 1950
Marcel Bovis 

inneroptics:

Solarization, 1950

Marcel Bovis 

(via artmodelnyc)

discardingimages:

dragon in pieces(Book of Daniel 14:23-27)
Pamplona Bible, Navarre 1197.
Amiens, Bibliothèque municipale, ms. 108, fol. 139v

discardingimages:

dragon in pieces
(Book of Daniel 14:23-27)

Pamplona Bible, Navarre 1197.

Amiens, Bibliothèque municipale, ms. 108, fol. 139v

(via artspotting)

automatiker:

Art by Alphonse Mucha (1896) 

automatiker:

Art by Alphonse Mucha (1896) 

(via beverleyshiller)

gundgallery:

The Thorncrown Chapel in Eureka Springs, Arkansas, designed by architect, E. Fay Jones.

(via thomortiz)


This print is from Man Ray’s portfolio ’Electro-magie’, and is a limited edition etching from Paris, dated 1976.

This print is from Man Ray’s portfolio ’Electro-magie’, and is a limited edition etching from Paris, dated 1976.

(via givesgoodface)

Depeche Mode – Enjoy the Silence

causticgrip:

I cannot believe I’ve never blogged this song.

(via secret-icecream-empress)

(Source: sanmarin0, via fouilis)

design-is-fine:

William Morris, artwork for The Story of the Dwellers at Eyr’, 1871. Via Birmingham Museums.

Morris had been fascinated by medieval illuminated manuscripts since childhood. This is his translation of the Eyrbtggja Saga, the first of the Norse sagas he had read with the Icelandic scholar Eirikr Magnusson. 

(via christoph-liebe)

archaicwonder:

Mary Queen of Scots at Wingfield Manor, Derbyshire, England
Wingfield Manor was built around 1450 for Ralph de Cromwell, 3rd Baron Cromwell, then Chancellor of England, on the site of a 12th-century castle and was bought by the second Earl of Shrewsbury. The design was the inspiration for Hampton Court Palace in London.
The sixth Earl of Shrewsbury was entrusted with the care of Mary, Queen of Scots, when she was detained from 1569 onwards, in his various houses around Derbyshire, Wingfield among them. It may have been here that she met Anthony Babington, whose family lived at Dethick nearby, who organised the abortive Babington Plot, a Recusant Catholic plot against Elizabeth I. The walnut tree in the north courtyard is reputed to have grown from a seed left when Anthony Babington smeared walnut juice over his face to disguise himself and enter the castle to see Mary, Queen of Scots. Unfortunately, the tree is not old enough for this story to be true.
At the time of the English Civil War (1642–48), the manor was in the hands of the Earl of Shrewsbury, a Parliament supporter. The Manor was taken by the Royalists in 1643 and then, after a siege, retaken by Parliament in 1644. It was located in what was then a strategic position near a main north-south artery of the country. It was partially demolished at the end of the Civil War, and then renovated some years later for Immanuel Halton, an astronomer. It was later further damaged when stone was taken for building Wingfield Hall, in the valley below. The manor has been deserted since the 1770s.

archaicwonder:

Mary Queen of Scots at Wingfield Manor, Derbyshire, England

Wingfield Manor was built around 1450 for Ralph de Cromwell, 3rd Baron Cromwell, then Chancellor of England, on the site of a 12th-century castle and was bought by the second Earl of Shrewsbury. The design was the inspiration for Hampton Court Palace in London.

The sixth Earl of Shrewsbury was entrusted with the care of Mary, Queen of Scots, when she was detained from 1569 onwards, in his various houses around Derbyshire, Wingfield among them. It may have been here that she met Anthony Babington, whose family lived at Dethick nearby, who organised the abortive Babington Plot, a Recusant Catholic plot against Elizabeth I. The walnut tree in the north courtyard is reputed to have grown from a seed left when Anthony Babington smeared walnut juice over his face to disguise himself and enter the castle to see Mary, Queen of Scots. Unfortunately, the tree is not old enough for this story to be true.

At the time of the English Civil War (1642–48), the manor was in the hands of the Earl of Shrewsbury, a Parliament supporter. The Manor was taken by the Royalists in 1643 and then, after a siege, retaken by Parliament in 1644. It was located in what was then a strategic position near a main north-south artery of the country. It was partially demolished at the end of the Civil War, and then renovated some years later for Immanuel Halton, an astronomer. It was later further damaged when stone was taken for building Wingfield Hall, in the valley below. The manor has been deserted since the 1770s.

(via musicmusingsandpoetry)

groundcovers:

Situated in the middle of a densely forested section of the Reford property, Rotunda, by Spanish firm City Laboratory, is designed to evolve over time, showcasing the ephemeral qualities of the natural world. In the beginning, the large, irregular black-metal disk will function as an ordinary reflecting pool.
Annual garden festival on the southern shore of the Saint Lawrence River in Quebec

groundcovers:

Situated in the middle of a densely forested section of the Reford property, Rotunda, by Spanish firm City Laboratory, is designed to evolve over time, showcasing the ephemeral qualities of the natural world. In the beginning, the large, irregular black-metal disk will function as an ordinary reflecting pool.

Annual garden festival on the southern shore of the Saint Lawrence River in Quebec

(via beverleyshiller)

cross-connect:

Ines Seidel is a book and paper artist based in Munich, Germany and probably best known for her altered books and paper objects.

About the work Seidel writes in her blog:

Instead of going on with their stories, these books remember where they came from and how everything began. I offered them black and white pictures of tree parts and dried twigs, all from my immediate surrounding. The books venture into a kind of regression therapy, where painful moments from childhood or even earlier lives are relived.

                                       :-)

(via beverleyshiller)

inneroptics:

Amanda Jasnowski

inneroptics:

Amanda Jasnowski

inneroptics:

Solarization, 1950
Marcel Bovis 

inneroptics:

Solarization, 1950

Marcel Bovis 

(via artmodelnyc)

discardingimages:

dragon in pieces(Book of Daniel 14:23-27)
Pamplona Bible, Navarre 1197.
Amiens, Bibliothèque municipale, ms. 108, fol. 139v

discardingimages:

dragon in pieces
(Book of Daniel 14:23-27)

Pamplona Bible, Navarre 1197.

Amiens, Bibliothèque municipale, ms. 108, fol. 139v

(via artspotting)

automatiker:

Art by Alphonse Mucha (1896) 

automatiker:

Art by Alphonse Mucha (1896) 

(via beverleyshiller)

gundgallery:

The Thorncrown Chapel in Eureka Springs, Arkansas, designed by architect, E. Fay Jones.

(via thomortiz)


This print is from Man Ray’s portfolio ’Electro-magie’, and is a limited edition etching from Paris, dated 1976.

This print is from Man Ray’s portfolio ’Electro-magie’, and is a limited edition etching from Paris, dated 1976.

(via givesgoodface)

(Source: dantesers, via le-paon-blanc)

Depeche Mode – Enjoy the Silence

causticgrip:

I cannot believe I’ve never blogged this song.

(via secret-icecream-empress)

About:

This site is for adults only (18+).

Disclaimer: All images, unless otherwise noted, were taken from the Internet and are assumed to be in the public domain. In the event that there is still a problem or error with copyrighted material, the break of the copyright is unintentional and noncommercial and the material will be removed immediately.